Five Tips for Talking with Parents About Aging

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You may have noticed that your parents are starting to show signs of needing extra help. Perhaps the house is more dirty than before, medication doses are being missed, or they are losing their appetite. Talking with parents about aging is difficult, but it’s definitely better to have these important conversations before something drastic happens.

Here are five tips to help make talking with parents about aging a bit easier and more productive.

  1. General guidelines

    An outline will help you organize your thoughts and make sure you don’t forget your important points. Focus on the most important considerations: safety, peace of mind, freedom and social connection.

  2. Be respectful

    Put yourself in their shoes and let them know you care about their feeling and wants. Let them talk and listen to what they have to say. Even if your relationship may change, don’t consider yourself the “parent”.

  3. Who and where?

    Include everyone in the family that should be there. Have the conversation in a quiet place where your parents feel comfortable.

  4. Practice!

    If you’re feeling nervous, run your ideas past someone who is impartial to the situation.

  5. Use conversation starters

    Start with casual conversations to get the thoughts rolling. Consider an ice breaker:

    • “I’ve noticed that some things take more energy for you these days. What are the main things that you really want to do?”

    • “What are your priorities? How can we make it easier for you?”

    • Reference an event in the news or a story about an aging friend or family member.

Source: “How to Talk With Parents About Aging: 5 Tips and Conversation Starters” from DailyCaring


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

World Alzheimer's Month

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As we say goodbye to summer and welcome the fall season, September is just around the corner. For older adults, September is an important month. September commemorates World Alzheimer's Month.

As most of us know from numerous reports, Alzheimer's is an insidious disease that has claimed many millions of sufferers and there is still no cure. What follows are some astounding facts about the current state of Alzheimer's from the Alzheimer's Association's 2019 Report.

  • 5.8 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's dementia.

  • The vast majority are age 65 and older.

  • Of those sufferers, nearly two-thirds are women.

  • Many Americans are under-diagnosed, if at all, and it is their family or loved ones who observe and can report on the change in behaviors.

  • In 2018, more than 18.5 billion hours of care were provided by caregivers for those with Alzheimer's.

Check out the website for more information about this disease as well as ways you can participate in your communities to support research and funding for finding a cure. The Walk to End Alzheimer's, which started in 1989, is the world's largest event to support research, funding for an end to this disease. If you are so inclined, it is very simple to register to participate in one of these walks in your community. I helped fundraise and walked with a team many years ago in support of my now deceased parents, and from personal experience, it was exhilarating, fun and I met so many giving and supportive people.

In addition, the Alzheimer's Association has a public policy arm, The Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM), that may be of interest as they are fighting for national support to end the disease. The research is indicating that a cure may be found as early as 2025. It is critical that national support is garnered for this disease which has struck more than 5.8 million at present. With the population aging rapidly, the numbers will probably go up and so the timing to get Federal support to fight this now incurable disease is critical and immediate.

September is also important because it is Falls Prevention Awareness Day (FPAD) on September 23rd. According to the National Institutes of Health and other institutions researching Alzheimer's/dementia and its association with falls, there appears to be a clear connection between Alzheimer's and a higher risk of falling. Since September celebrates both these two situations, here are a few findings about the connection and why Falls Prevention is crucial to maintaining a good quality of life.

  • People with Alzheimer's are three times more likely to fall and have a hip fracture or more serious fall outcomes.

  • Many factors may contribute to this with some that have been identified such as: physical changes affect a person's gait, mobility; spatial judgment is reduced; reflexes are not as sharp; vision may also be negatively impacted. In addition, the effect of some prescribed medications may result in drowsiness, dizziness or lowered blood pressure.

FPAD is celebrated nationwide with its many Fall Prevention partnerships and in our community, both Alameda County and Contra Costa County support and sponsor activities to expand awareness of steps to take to avoid this occurrence.

In Alameda specifically, we are preparing seniors for Falls Prevention with our current classes at Mastick Senior Center. By collaborating with Alameda County Health System, we are conducting A Matter of Balance Workshop, an evidence-based program to provide seniors skills and tips to avoid falls. We hold these classes at least twice yearly to support our senior community.

Written by: Gayle Uchida, Community Relations


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.



Medication and Fall Prevention

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One of the key factors in avoiding falls is to be aware of the side effects of some medications in accelerating falls. Many seniors are prescribed several medications for ongoing or current conditions and they, alone or taken with other prescriptions, can contribute to a devastating fall that can change someone's life.

This article from Daily Caring gives great detail about the class of medications that you should know about if you are or have been prescribed them by your doctor. Being your own advocate is very important to maintaining your health as the bevy of doctors who care for you may not be in contact with each other. so they may prescribe something that has adverse interactions with another medication or your physical condition, such as dizziness, weakened legs, etc.

As an ongoing program and in conjunction with Mastick Senior Center in Alameda, Alice Home Care and Highland Hospital will be holding FREE Matter of Balance classes for Fall Prevention for seniors starting August 6th-August 29th. It will be held Tuesday and Thursday from 10:00AM-12:00PM (RSVP at 510-747-7500).
This is an important program for seniors at risk of falling or even to learn proactive activities to avoid falls and is great preparation for Falls Prevention Day 2019. This year it is on Wednesday, September 23rd.

Be careful of the medications you are prescribed and their side effects which may contribute to falls. You can help yourself learn falls prevention techniques at the free class at Alameda's Mastick Center.

Written by: Gayle Uchida, Community Relations


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

Happy 4th of July!

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Happy 4th of July from all us at Alice Home Care! We hope you had a wonderful time celebrating with family and friends. Over 160 floats and 2500 participants (ourselves included!) traveled a three-mile route during the Alameda 4th of July Parade, one of the largest and longest Independence Day parades in the nation. We were thrilled to participate in the parade again this year and be a part of the wonderful Alameda community.

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Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

Chair Yoga for Seniors

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Chair Yoga enables you to practice yoga no matter your age or physical condition. And the benefits remain the same:

  • Mindfulness as a tool for stress relief

  • Maintain your strength, balance and flexibility

  • Key to your well being and self-care

  • It is fun as you can do it at your own pace

This type of yoga is available at many yoga studios but also at many Senior Centers. In fact, Mastick Senior Center in Alameda offers chair yoga in addition to standing yoga poses. Try the 30 minute chair yoga sequence below from YouTube; you may enjoy it! Instructor Sherry Zak Morris makes the class engaging and explains the benefits behind each movement.

I have been practicing yoga for nearly 20 years and the benefits I listed above are what I have gained and then some. There is a community when you are doing the poses and everyone in the room is doing this to help their quality of life. It is heartening to know that when my physical condition makes it tough to do standing yoga poses, chair yoga is available to me. There is a woman in my class who must be in her mid-80's and always mentions that yoga has kept her in shape and healthy. Watching her do the poses with such ease is inspiring to me when I take a class with her.

Written by: Gayle Uchida, Community Relations

Source: Chair Yoga for Seniors: Reduce Pain and Improve Health (Video) from DailyCaring


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

A Matter of Balance Workshop - This August!

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Many older adults experience concerns about falling and thus restrict their activities. A MATTER OF BALANCE is an award-winning program designed to manage falls and increase activity levels. 

If you’re not living life to the fullest because you’re afraid of falling, this workshop is for you. After four weeks of two-hour classes 2x/week, you’ll be active again, with more strength and confidence.

You will learn to:

  • view falls as controllable

  • set goals for increasing activity

  • make changes to reduce fall risks at home

  • exercise to increase strength and balance

Who should attend?

  • anyone concerned about falls

  • anyone interested in improving balance, flexibility and strength

  • anyone who has fallen in the past

  • anyone who has restricted activities because of falling concerns

Hosted by: Alice Lai-Bitker from Alice Home Care and Stefania Kaplanes, MSW from Alameda Health Systems

Where: Mastick Senior Center in Alameda, 1155 Santa Clara Avenue Room E

When: August 6th - August 29th, Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:00AM - 12:00PM

RSVP: (510) 747-7500


A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls Volunteer Lay Leader Model ©2006

This program is based on Fear of Falling: A Matter of Balance ©1995 Trustees of Boston University. All rights reserved. Used and adapted by permission of Boston University.

A Matter of Balance Lay Leader Model

Recognized for Innovation and Quality in Healthcare and Aging, 2006, American Society on Aging. A Matter of Balance Lay Leader Model was developed by a grant from the Administration on Aging (#90AM2780).

This project was supported, in part by grant number 90FP0018-01-01 from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy. 


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

Five Ways Cooking Can Keep You Young

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Cooking for yourself has been shown to improve your physical, cognitive and emotional well-being as you age. In fact, it just might be the secret ingredient to aging successfully. Here are five ways cooking can keep you young.

1. Increases physicality

Before any cooking starts, the health benefits already kick in! You need to shop for your ingredients, which is a great way to add exercise into the day. Additionally, food preparation has been associated with increased levels of physical activity and self-reported health status. If possible, shop for ingredients on a daily basis, which will not only increase your daily physical activity, but also ensure you are using the freshest produce.

2. Helps social and emotional health

Cooking classes can help sharpen kitchen skills, while also improving psychological well being and sense of self. This is especially true when connecting older adults to the aspect of their heritage. Try cooking and sharing some traditional dishes with your community.

3. Improves diet quality

Cooking classes can also improve the quality of your meals. Older adults enrolled in cooking classes include more vegetables and fiber in their diets, which are associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Cooking for yourself also means you control what goes into your food, which can improve your quality of health throughout your life.

4. Maintains mental fitness

Cooking can also help improve your cognitive functioning, which generally decreases as you age. Paying attention to cooking times, following a recipe, and setting a table forces you to use your prospective memory. Try cooking a brand new recipe with multiple steps for an added challenge!

5. Adapts to your unique situation

If you are no longer living independently, there are various cooking modifications that may be beneficial for you. Updating your kitchen technology, such as oven sensors and safety systems that can shut off power when needed, may offset physical limitations and other possible hazards. Meal delivery programs, such as Blue Apron or HelloFresh, provide pre-portioned ingredients and recipes to your doorstep so you don’t need to leave the house. Caregivers can also help with the shopping and meal preparation, and cook alongside with you to make things easier.

Have you been spending time in the kitchen? Share your favorite recipes with us!

Source: “What is the Recipe for Success? 5 Ways Cooking Can Keep You Young” from Psychology Benefits Society


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

Falls Prevention Awareness Month with Alice Home Care

To celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness in September (Falls Prevention Awareness Day is September 22), Alice Home Care is hosting the following FREE events:


Medication Management and Falls Prevention (for Cantonese speakers)

Speaker: Kam Tam, Retired Pharmacist at Children's Hospital, Oakland and co-owner of Oakland Pharmacy

When: Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Time: 11:00AM-12:00PM

Where: Harbor Bay Community Center, 3195 Mecartney Road


Medication Management and Falls Prevention (for English speakers)

Speaker: Larry Poon, Retired Pharmacist at Sutter Health's Eden Hospital

When: Friday, September 21, 2018

Time: 11:00AM-12:00PM

Where: Alameda Free Library, Stafford Room, 1550 Oak Street


Evidence-Based Matter of Balance (MOB) Workshop

With the Alameda Fire Department Senior Safety Program

When: 8 week session starting Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Time: 10:00AM-12:00PM

Where: Mastick Senior Center, 1155 Santa Clara Avenue

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For more information on these events, contact Alice Home Care at 510-924-8529 or visit www.alicehomecare.com.


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts

To learn more about Falls Prevention, visit the National Council on Aging.

Alameda Friendly Visitors Needs Volunteers

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Alameda Friendly Visitors, a companion program to Alameda Meals on Wheels, is in need of volunteers to spend one hour a week to visit someone in need of companionship.

Please forward this to any friends/family members who might be interested in volunteering. If you belong to a club or organization please let the other members know that they are in need of volunteers. 
 

Can you spare an hour or two each week to brighten someone’s day?

Please help our community and become a friendly visitor today!

To learn more about the program and to sign up as a friendly visitor volunteer, please contact Joyce Leighton at friendlyvisitors@sbcglobal.net or call 510-748-0342.


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts

Alzheimer's End of Life and Dementia Assessment

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Did you care for a person with dementia who died in the last 2 years?

Did this person live in Alameda County or receive services in Alameda County?

If you answered YES to these questions, we would like to hear from you.

The Alzheimer’s Association of Northern California and Northern Nevada is working to assess the ways healthcare and community service providers in Alameda County work with people with dementia and their caregivers to make end-of-life care decisions.

They have developed a survey that will take approximately 30-45 minutes and can be completed online at this link. After successful completion, respondents will receive a $100 gift card for their time. Responses will remain anonymous.

The Alzheimer’s Association of Northern California and Northern Nevada is also looking for Alameda County Providers who serve people with dementia to share their experiences with them.

They have developed a survey that will take approximately 15-25 minutes and can be completed online at this link. Please complete this by: Friday, July 27, 2018. Responses will remain anonymous.

The information learned will be used to improve services and systems that help people with dementia and their caregivers choose person-centered options that honor their end-of-life wishes.

If you are interested in learning more or prefer to complete this survey on paper, please contact Rachel Main at the Alzheimer’s Association, Rmain@alz.org or 415-463-8505.


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts

To learn more about the Alzheimer's Association of Northern California and Northern Nevada, click here.

Tips for Promoting Social Interaction to Combat Loneliness in Seniors

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Did you know that loneliness may be as significant a health factor as smoking? This is according to Vivek Murthy, the former United States surgeon general, who has written that loneliness is “associated with a reduction in life span similar to that caused by smoking 15 cigarettes a day and even greater than that associated with obesity.”

Research from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) discovered that 43% of older adults report feelings of loneliness, and a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences even found that loneliness is linked with a higher risk of mortality. Additional epidemiological studies have associated loneliness and social isolation to heart disease, cancer, depression, diabetes and suicide.

It is clear that prevention needs to start early by understanding the serious problem of loneliness in seniors. Along with caregivers, older adults and family members should have a clear understanding of the available services in their area.

Tips for Promoting Social Interaction

Local Senior Programs

Many local communities have programs for older adults to engage with others and try out new activities or hobbies, such as gardening, board games, exercise or painting. Activities may be held on a weekly or monthly basis. Make sure to reach out to local community groups, senior centers, or churches, as well as local agencies on aging.

Technology

There are a variety of types of technology to can help engage seniors, such as something to remind them to take their medication, a personal emergency response system around their wrist, or a simple, senior-friendly, pre-programmed device.

Telemedicine offerings, such as wellness calls, can also help with feelings of loneliness. The Friendship Line, provided by the Institute on Aging, describes itself as "the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults." This free service was founded, and is still run, by Dr. Patrick Arbore. In 2017 alone, the Friendship Line had 148,000 calls nationwide staffed by a team of trained volunteers. How does it work? Participants choose whether they want to call in or be called by a friendly voice who will chat with them reminding them to take medication, check in to ensure they are safe, check to see if they have proper meals, or even just to chat.

Staff from Alice Home Care attended for 45th Anniversary of the Friendship Line in May 2018. Dr. Abore imparted some key words of wisdom in his speech, saying a lot about the heart and soul he has poured into this program.  

Connection with others binds us to life.

Service is the rent we pay for being human.
— Dr. Patrick Arbore

Companion Caregivers

Caregiving comes in many forms, but one important caregiving service is companionship. This can include grocery shopping, meal preparation, visits to friends and neighbors, conversation and fun activities. Regular visits from a companion caregiver can keep seniors mentally active and engaged, reducing the risk of loneliness. The relationship between the senior and caregiver can be truly heartwarming.

Loneliness is seniors is a serious problem, but one that can be preventable. Making social engagement a priority early on will have a long-term impact on mental health and happiness.

Sources: "How to Combat Loneliness and Isolation as We Age" from Forbes; "Is Loneliness a Health Epidemic?" from New York Times


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

New Name. Same Helping Hands. Same Caring Hearts.

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We would like to share some important news with you. Effective September 15, 2017, our company will change its name to Alice Home Care. Though we are fond of the “Peace of Mind” name, we discovered that another company in Boston had already claimed the name before us. Please, rest assured that this change will not affect your care or billing, but if you are currently on autopay, you may see the name change reflected in your bank statement.

If you have any questions, please call us at anytime at 510-924-8529


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts.

Falls Prevention Awareness Day 2017

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Did you know that 1 in 3 Americans aged 65+ falls each year? Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for elder Americans. Every September on the first day of fall, the National Council on Aging and the Falls Free Initiative work to promote Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The 10th annual Falls Prevention Awareness Day will be observed on September 22, 2017, and Alice Home Care (formerly Peace of Mind Home Care) is hosting a day filled with free workshops and activities to celebrate one day early, on September 21st!

* Yoga poses for improved flexibility

* Medication Management tips from an expert

* Tricks to prevent falls from a Physical Therapist

*Community Paramedic Program introduction from Alameda Fire Department

 

Alameda Free Library, 1550 Oak Street

Thursday, September 21, 2017 from 10AM-1PM

Sponsored by Alameda Fire Department and Alice Home Care

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Bring your friends and your neighbors, and we will see you on September 21st!


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts

To learn more about Falls Prevention, visit the National Council on Aging.

A Matter of Balance: Reflection

Every Tuesday for the past eight weeks, a group of older adults with concerns about falling gathered at the Alameda Main Library. They were joined by Alice Lai-Bitker from Peace of Mind Home Care and David McGuinness Senior Services, hosts of A MATTER OF BALANCE - a national evidence based program, sponsored by Alameda County Senior Injury Prevention Program, designed to manage falls and increase activity levels. 

This group of older adults learned how to:

  • view falls as preventable
  • set goals for increasing activity
  • make changes to reduce fall risks at home
  • exercise to increase strength and balance

What were some reflections from the workshop?

--The workshop was really good. It taught me how to get up when I do fall and gave me safety tips on how to avoid falls.

--This was an eye opener for me and now I am more aware of falls and their danger. I even took steps to make my house more age friendly and safer for me to live in. It was beneficial for me to attend.

--It was very good and has helped me plan for actual life situations so I can be prepared.

--Excellent workshop. I learned how to exercise properly, proper standing poses and some procedures to use to get up from a fall. Very helpful.

--It made me pay attention to how I can avoid falls.

--When I go on trips I will be more conscious of my actions so I will be safe and enjoy my travel injury-free. (Fenstermachers)

When asked what changes have already been made as a result of the class, this is what was shared:

--I learned to be more serious about my physical activity.

--I feel more accepting of using aides- cane, walker, grab bar. 

--I rechecked my home for safety.

--I put bars in my bath tub, and I am aware of what I am doing and watch where I am walking.  The class has opened my thoughts to improve my balance and prevent falling.

--I discipline myself, set a goal and accomplish as much as I can, but not over exhaust myself to fall. 

--I made safety corrections at home.  I walk more with greater care and exercise more. I am more aware of hazards.  

Lai-Bitker really enjoyed leading the workshop. "It's wonderful to see them participate honestly" she explained, "sharing their own experience of falls and strategize together for solutions and how to handle embarrassing moments."

We are currently accepting sign ups for our next session in the summer, beginning August 1st. Sign up here.


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

To learn more about A MATTER OF BALANCE, visit the National Council on Aging or check out our previous blog post.

Fall Prevention at Home

Did you know that more than 75% of falls take place at home? There are some quick and simple changes you can make to help reduce your risk of falling. When assessing your home, remember to pay attention to these three things:

  1. Good lighting
  2. Clutter
  3. Easy access to things used most

You also want to ensure you have THREE POINTS OF CONTACT for whatever you are doing (i.e. getting out of the shower, walking up stairs). This means having two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand in contact with something sturdy.

The front door:

  • If you have steps at your front entrance, make sure they are not broken or uneven. Fix damaged steps as soon as possible.
  • Make sure entryways are well lit so you can see where you are walking. 
  • Consider installing a grab bar to help with balance.

Kitchen:

  • Organize your commonly used items, such as plates, cups, bowls, and even seasonings, within reach. This will help you avoid using a step stool to reach higher items.
  • Scatter rugs are tripping hazards, so replace any with rubber backed rugs that will stay in place.
  • Clean up spills right away.

Stairs:

  • Keep stairs free of clutter.
  • Add strips of colored tape to on the edges of each step to help you visualize the stairs better.
  • Have lighting at the top and bottom of the stairs.
  • Add a second handrail to help with balance.

Hallway:

  • Check your lighting, but don't change lightbulbs yourself. Ask family members, friends or neighbors to help you.

Bedroom:

  • Ensure the light near the bed is easy to reach.
  • Keep the path from the bed to the bathroom clear of clutter and well lit. 
  • Consider installing a bedrail to provide support while getting in and out of bed.
  • Keep the phone at arm's reach of your bed. 

Bathroom:

  • Add a non-slip rubber mat to the shower, as the traction will help prevent slipping.
  • Install grab bars by the toilet and tub. Remember that towel racks are not proper grab bars. 

Have you made other changes to your home that we didn't mention? Please share them with us!

Source: National Council on Aging


Alice Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with helping hands and caring hearts

A Matter of Balance

Many older adults experience concerns about falling and thus restrict their activities. A MATTER OF BALANCE is an award-winning program designed to manage falls and increase activity levels. 

This program emphasizes practical strategies to manage falls. 

You will learn to:

  • view falls as controllable
  • set goals for increasing activity
  • make changes to reduce fall risks at home
  • exercise to increase strength and balance

Who should attend?

  • anyone concerned about falls
  • anyone interested in improving balance, flexibility and strength
  • anyone who has fallen in the past
  • anyone who has restricted activities because of falling concerns

Hosted by: Alice Lai-Bitker from Peace of Mind Home Care and David McGuinness Senior Services

Where: Alameda Library 1550 Oak Street

START DATE: Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 10:00AM - 12:00PM

Classes are held weekly on TUESDAYS from 10:00AM - 12:00PM for 8 weeks, for FREE!

There are 3 ways to sign up:

  1. (510) 924-8529
  2. guchida@peaceofmindhc.com
  3. Through our website, click here

A Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns About Falls Volunteer Lay Leader Model ©2006

This program is based on Fear of Falling: A Matter of Balance ©1995 Trustees of Boston University. All rights reserved. Used and adapted by permission of Boston University.

A Matter of Balance Lay Leader Model

Recognized for Innovation and Quality in Healthcare and Aging, 2006, American Society on Aging. A Matter of Balance Lay Leader Model was developed by a grant from the Administration on Aging (#90AM2780).

This project was supported, in part by grant number 90FP0018-01-01 from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy. 


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

6 Steps to Protect Your Older Loved Ones From a Fall

Did you know that every year, 1 in 3 older Americans fall? While falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries for those aged 65+, the good news is that most can be prevented. Here is how you can help.

  1. Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe.
    • Ask older loved ones if they are concerned about falling, and suggest they discuss their concerns with their health care provider.
  2. Discuss their current health conditions.
    • Find out if they are experiencing any problems managing their health, i.e. trouble remembering to take medication, experiencing side effects, or having trouble doing things easily. 
  3. Ask about their last eye check.
    • If your older loved one wears glasses, ensure they have a current prescription. Tint-changing lenses can be dangerous when going from bright sun into a darkened room. Bifocals can also cause problems on stairs.
  4. Notice if they're holding onto walls, furniture, or someone else when walking or if they appear to have difficulty walking or arising from a chair.
    • If so, these are signs that they should see a physical therapist, who can help improve balance, strength and flexibility through proper exercises. A cane or walker may also be suggested.
  5. Talk about their medications.
    • Encourage your older loved one to speak with their doctor or pharmacist if they are having a hard time remembering to take their medication. In addition, watch out for non-prescription medications that contain sleep aids, which can lead to dizziness and balance problems. 
  6. Do a walk-through safety assessment of their home. 
    • There are simple and inexpensive ways to make a house safer. For example, increase lighting, make sure there are two secure rails on the stairs, and install grab bars near the toilet and in the bathtub or shower. 

Source: National Council on Aging


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

Join us on September 22nd from 10am-2pm at the Alameda Free Library as we celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness Day with free workshops and activities! For more information on this event, click here

 

Falls Prevention Awareness Day

Did you know that 1 in 3 Americans aged 65+ falls each year? Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries for elder Americans. Every September on the first day of fall, the National Council on Aging and the Falls Free Initiative work to promote Falls Prevention Awareness Day. The 9th annual Falls Prevention Awareness Day will be observed on September 22, 2016, and Peace of Mind Home Care is hosting a day filled with free workshops and activities!

 

*Yoga poses for improved flexibility

*Tai Chi sequences for improved balance

*Medication Management tips from an expert

*Tricks to prevent falls from a Physical Therapist

*Brain Fitness exercises from an expert 

 

Alameda Free Library, 1550 Oak Street 

Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 10AM-2PM

Sponsored by Peace of Mind Home Care of Alameda

Bring your friends and your neighbors, and we will see you on September 22nd!


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

To learn more about Falls Prevention, visit the National Council on Aging.

Alzheimer's Disease as an Adventure in Wonderland

A page from “Aliceheimer’s: Alzheimer’s Through the Looking Glass,” by Dr. Dana Walrath.

A page from “Aliceheimer’s: Alzheimer’s Through the Looking Glass,” by Dr. Dana Walrath.

Dr. Dana Walrath, a medical anthropologist with a background in art and writing, used her three year experience caregiving for her mother, Alice, to inspire the memoir, “Aliceheimer’s: Alzheimer’s Through the Looking Glass,”. Alice was in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease during this time, and the book is a tribute to her animated mind.

"Aliceheimers" was created with the technique of graphic medicine, which uses text and graphics to “let us better understand those who are hurting, feel their stories, and redraw and renegotiate those social boundaries.”

 When asked in an interview with the New York Times about how her book might influence the caregiving community, Dr. Walrath shared the following:

I would love to see “Aliceheimer’s” contribute to reframing dementia as a diversity issue. Of course there is loss involved, but the more we can see people living in this state as useful true humans who might teach us all something about living in the present, about knowing sides of our loved ones that social processes kept inaccessible, the better it will be.

To learn more about graphic medicine, the background behind the book's creation, and how it can help others caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease, read the whole article on the New York Times Health Blog.


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

To learn more about Alzheimer's disease, visit the Alzheimer's Association.

Elder Abuse Awareness

Did you know that one out of 20 elder Americans are victims of elder abuse each year? While elder abuse can take many forms, including neglect, emotional abuse, abandonment, financial abuse, or physical/sexual abuse, 40% of those victims are due to financial exploitation.

Learn to recognize the warning signs of elder abuse so you can help stop the cycle:

  • Caregiver appears too aggressive or exhibits uncomfortable behavior
  • Elder unable to speak for him or herself in presence of caregiver
  • Bruises, abnormal skin changes, dirty appearance, poor hygiene
  • Personality changes, hesitation to talk openly
  • Sudden involvement of previously uninvolved relative or new friend
  • Unexplained changes to will, power of attorney, or other legal documents

If you see any of these signs, contact the Alameda County Family Justice Center Elder Protection Unit, your local Law Enforcement, or Adult Protective Services (APS) at 1-866-225-5377.

Alameda County Family Justice Center

470 27th Street
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: (510) 267-880

Source: Alameda County District Attorney's Office


Peace of Mind Home Care is here to help provide compassionate care for your loved ones who struggle to remain independent in their homes. Give us a call at 510-924-8529 and let us provide you with Peace of Mind

To learn more about Elder Abuse, visit the National Center for Elder Abuse.